Nadja Nevolovitsch, violon


 

Praised by the press for her high musical sensitivity and purity of interpretations, violinist Nadja Nevolovitsch performs regularly in famous concert halls, such as De Singel in Antwerp, Palais des Beaux Arts in Brussels, Concertgebouw in Bruges, Casa da Musica in Porto, Victoria Hall in Geneva, Philharmonia in St. Petersburg and the Performing Arts Center in Tel Aviv.

Nadja made her debut as a soloist with St. Petersburg State Symphony Orchestra at the age of 11. Since then, she has performed with numerous orchestras, including the Lithuanian National Orchestra, Brussels Philharmonic Orchestra, Norddeutsche Philharmonie Rostock, New Russia State Symphony Orchestra, Baden-Badener Philharmonie, Camerata Menuhin, Harmos Festival Orchestra and has worked with conductors such as Rudolf Werthen, Shlomo Mintz, Dirk Vermeulen, Ronald Zollman, Andrej Petrenko and Ivo Venkov.

Highlights of the season 2014/2015 include her debut at Konzerthaus Berlin and the release of her new CD with Peter Van de Velde.

Nadja Nevolovitsch won numerous prizes at international competitions such as the Henri Wieniawsky competition in Poland and the Toshiya Eto competition in Tokyo. She won 1st prize at the national German competition “Jugend musiziert” in 2001 and had successes in 3 consecutive competitions in 2005, a year in which she won 2nd prize as well as the children’s jury prize and the special prize for the best interpretation of a contemporary piece at the Sion-Valais international competition in Switzerland, the 2nd prize, audience prize and several special awards at the Queen Sophie Charlotte international competition in Germany and 1st prize at the European Competition for Young Soloists in Luxembourg.

An enthusiastic chamber musician, Nadja Nevolovitsch was the 1st violinist of the Menuhin Academy string quartet in 2011. That same year, she won the 1st prize and the audience prize at the Chamonix-Mont-Blanc quartet competition in France.

She has performed with artists including Yuri Bashmet, Lynn Harrell, Thomas Brandis, Evelinde Trenkner, Diemut Poppen, Martin Ostertag, Máté Szücs and Viktoria Lakissova and has appeared at renowned festivals, including Festival International de Musique Sion-Valais in Switzerland, Chamber Music Connects the World in Kronberg (Germany), Scharwenka festival in Szamotuly (Poland) and Internationales Lübecker Kammermusikfest in Germany, where she has been regularly invited to perform various unknown works over the past few years.

From her early childhood, Nadja Nevolovitsch has formed a duo with her sister Marianna Nevolovitsch (piano) and since 2010 she has also joined forces with organist Peter Van de Velde, with whom she recorded her latest CD: “Encounters” (Aeolus, 2012). The album received excellent reviews.

Born in St. Petersburg into a family of musicians, Nadja Nevolovitsch started playing the violin at the age of 6. After her first years of education at the Specialized Music School for gifted children in St. Petersburg, she moved to Germany with her family. There, she entered the class of Zakhar Bron in Lübeck. She would later also study with Anna Netchiporouk-Bron, Thomas Brandis and Liviu Prunaru.

From 2004 to 2008, Nadja studied with Igor Oistrakh at the Royal Conservatory in Brussels where she obtained her Masters degree with greatest distinction, followed by the soloist degree (Konzertexamen) in 2013 at the Hochschule für Musik und Theater Rostock, where she attended Petru Munteanu’s class. She received further musical impulses and guidance from Ivry Gitlis.

In the period 2008-2009, Nadja Nevolovitsch was a teaching assistant with Igor Oistrakh at the Royal Conservatory of Brussels. In the past few years, she has given masterclasses at the “Pipes for Peace” festival in Cairo and at the Rimsky-Korsakov Academy in Brussels, where she has been a guest-teacher since 2012.

Nadja Nevolovitsch currently plays a violin by Camillus Camilli, made in Mantua in 1731, which she received on loan from the German musical instrument foundation “Deutsche Stiftung Musikleben”, Hamburg.